28. Pop-up Stoop Culture

The temporary nature of pop-ups mean that they can function as initial or intermediate steps larger, more expensive, and longer-term solutions that require more time and energy to establish. In this case, stoop culture is a multi-variable ideal that involves housing, walkability, proximity of stoops to sidewalks, and contemporary social dynamics.  To really create the…

27. Pop-up Farmer’s Market at the Local Cup

The Local Cup is one of those lovely additions to a neighborhood that really helps define a culture and sense of place.  It’s a pay-it-forward coffee shop, run by volunteers, that has really grown into a mainstay for the community it sits in.  Given it’s rising popularity, and the 100 Ideas Project mantra of supporting…

26. Pop-up Bus Lanes

“We were like, ‘Let’s just throw up some cones and see what happens for a week.’” Buses are equitable transportation.  Gary Hustwit’s film, Urbanized, highlights one city saying they will pave bike lanes before car lanes because bike lanes are for everyone, whereas not everyone can afford to buy a car. You don’t have to…

25. Pop-up Park Crawl

What do you get when you cross and pop-up park and a pub crawl?  A pop-up park crawl.  Pub crawls are great ways to explore a city, and as we head into St. Patrick’s Day weekend, they’ll be popular ways to experience culture (at least a little).  Why not use that concept to explore design…

24. West Side Wednesday Art Space

  Through intensive design and planning processes and the implementation of a new streetscape, the West Side of South Bend is the newest “comeback” story for the City.  A cultural nexus that brings together a variety of businesses, food experiences, organizations, and most importantly, people – Western Avenue is one of my favorite places to hangout….

23. Pop-up Mini-Golf

First thought, it would be fun to do this on the top of one of the parking garages downtown with a great view of the City.  Special precaution would have to be taken to insure no wandering golf balls make their way off of the garage, but using the often occupied space for a unique…

22. Park in a Pod

Typical infrastructure projects  – like parks, street bump-outs – costs municipalities a lot of capital.  Those projects take a long time to design and implement (sometimes years or longer); they involve significant amounts of political and social involvement, talking each aspect through to ensure the best results; and they cost hefty sums of money.  Tactical urbanism by…

21. Showcase Equity Through Art in our Parks

“Art makes people think and question, and people change the world.” – Chirlane McCray On the last post of Art Week, I want to reflect on HeForShe‘s goal of building solidarity for gender equality. Public space can be used to facilitate art, as reflected in the other ideas this week, which means that it can also be…

20. Create Neighborhood Scale Art Installations

So far with public art, we’ve focused on highly visible locations, but it’s also important for art to meet us in our everyday lives.  Some cities, like New York, often market their neighborhoods by their access to art.  It doesn’t have to be as dramatic as the house in the featured image or as stiff…

19. Rethink Bus Stops

While public transit may have an image issue, there are many reasons why people don’t ride.  While two-thirds of people support mass transit, only 5 percent of commuters travel that way.  Energy efficiency faces much the same problem.  Despite knowing that they could save hundreds of dollars per year on their energy bills, people aren’t…

18. Create Street Art Outlets

Impressionism is the 19th century art movement that changed the way we looked at the world and it almost didn’t happen.  Renaissance ideals typified art at the time, from perfect brush stokes that were barely perceptible to epic scenes of history, religion, or mythology.  The Paris Salon institution served as the primary judge of “good…

17. Use Public Space to Communicate

As Mark Rios described at last year’s ASLA Annual Meeting, “telling the story of a place is complex, diverse, and layered.”  Thinking about that this morning, with the HeForShe campaign celebrating Art Week today in conjunction with International Women’s Day, has me wondering how we can better use our public spaces to communicate our story. Infrastructure -like buildings, street…